Resources and Publications

The Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program has created a series of reports which describe patterns of individual types of cancer in Los Angeles County.  These reports illustrate how these patterns vary among racial/ethnic groups and by sex and how they change during 2000-2017.  These reports are available for download, both as PDF files and PowerPoint.

Currently available publications are:

  • Colon
  • Rectum
  • Colorectum
  • Lung
  • Female Breast

Soon to be available publications are:

  • Prostate
  • Liver
  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia among children and teenagers

Colorectal Cancer Minimonograph

Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer among men and the second most common among women in Los Angeles County. Over 3,800 people are newly diagnosed with colorectal cancer every year in Los Angeles County. Colorectal cancer occurs most commonly in the older population with an incidence rate of 71 per 100,000 for 50-64 year olds and 215 per 100,000 for 65+ year olds. Due to active screening for those 50 years of age or older, localized disease is more common in the older population, but younger patients are more frequently diagnosed with distant disease for whom screening recommendations are lacking. Non-Hispanic Blacks experience the worst burden of colorectal cancer as they have the highest incidence rate, higher proportion of distant disease and the highest rate of mortality. Compared to Non-Hispanic Whites, Non-Hispanic Blacks have 23% higher risk of being diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 56% higher risk of dying from colorectal cancer. Hispanics have lowest incidence and lower mortality than non-Hispanic Whites. Incidence rates of this cancer have steadily declined since 2000, most notably among Non-Hispanic Blacks and for localized diseases, but not in Hispanics. Mortality rates have also declined significantly for those over 65 years of age, but have remained unaffected for the other age groups. Risk for colorectal cancer is increased with an excess weight, sedentary lifestyle, red meat consumption, smoking, and alcohol intake. Those with family history of colon cancer or adenomatous polyps, Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease are also at elevated risk of colon cancer.

To view the full Colorectal Cancer Report, click on the buttons below!

Colon Cancer Minimonograph

Colon Cancer

Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer for both men and women in Los Angeles County. Over 2,700 people are newly diagnosed with colon cancer every year in Los Angeles County. Colon cancer occurs most commonly in the older population with an incidence rate of 45 per 100,000 for 50-64 year olds and 163 per 100,000 for 65+ year olds. Due to active screening for those 50 years of age or older, localized disease is more common in the older population, but younger patients are more frequently diagnosed with distant disease for whom screening recommendations are lacking. Non-Hispanic Blacks experience the worst burden of colon cancer as they have the highest incidence rate, highest proportion of distant disease and the highest rate of mortality. Compared to Non-HispanicWhites, Non-Hispanic Blacks have 30% higher risk of being diagnosed with colon cancer and 60%higher risk of dying from colon cancer. Hispanics and most Asians/Pacific Islanders have lower incidence and lower mortality than non-Hispanic Whites. Hawaiian/Samoans are the exception with incidence rates 50% higher than Non-Hispanic Whites. Incidence rates of this cancer have steadily declined since 2000, most notably among Non-Hispanic Blacks and for localized and regional diseases, but not among Hispanics. Mortality rates have also declined significantly for those over 65 years of age, but have remained stable for the other age groups. Risk for colon cancer is increased with an excess weight, sedentary lifestyle, red meat consumption, smoking, and alcohol intake. Those with family history of colon cancer or adenomatous polyps, Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease are also at elevated risk of colon cancer.

To view the full Colorectal Cancer Report, click on the buttons below!

Rectal Cancer Minimonograph

Rectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer among men and the second most common among women in Los Angeles County. Rectal cancer accounts for about 30% of colorectal cancers. Taken separately, rectal cancer alone is the 9th most common cancer for both men and women. Over 1,100 people are newly diagnosed with rectal cancer every year in Los Angeles County. Rectal cancer occurs most frequently in the older population with an incidence rate of 26 per 100,000 for 50-64 year olds and 52 per 100,000 for 65+ year olds. Due to active screening program for those 50 years of age or older, localized disease is more common in the older population, but younger patients are more frequently diagnosed with distant disease for whom screening recommendations are lacking. Incidence of rectal cancer is higher in several Asian Pacific Islander subgroups such as Hawaiian/Samoans and Japanese. Incidence rates of this cancer have steadily declined since 2000, most notably for localized diseases. Non-Hispanic Blacks experience excess burden of rectal cancer as they have highest proportion of distant disease and the highest rate of mortality. Compared to Non-Hispanic Whites, risk of dying for Non-Hispanic Black male patients is 23% higher and for Hawaiian/Samoan male patients is 44% higher. All other Asians/Pacific Islander groups and Hispanics have lower mortality than non-Hispanic Whites. Mortality rates have also declined significantly for those over 65 years of age, but have remained stable for the other age groups. Risk for rectal cancer is increased with an excess weight, sedentary lifestyle, red meat consumption, smoking, and alcohol intake. Those with family history of colon cancer or adenomatous polyps, Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease are also at elevated risk of colon cancer.

 

To view the full Rectal Cancer Report, click on the buttons below!

Lung Cancer Minimonograph

Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is the second or third most common cancer among men of most racial/ethnic groups in Los Angeles County. Among women, it is the third or fourth most common cancer for most racial/ethnic groups. Over 36,000 men and 32,000 women were diagnosed with lung cancer in Los Angeles County between 2000-2017 with about 1,900 men and 1,800 women diagnosed in 2017. Lung cancer incidence and mortality rates are much higher in men than in women in all race/ethnic groups, and non-Hispanic Blacks experience the highest incidence and mortality in both men and women. The incidence and mortality have declined substantially among men but not in women between 2000-2017. In particular, the incidence in Asian/Pacific Islander women and Hispanic women has remained stable. About 60% of lung cancers are diagnosed at distant stage and survival is poor with only 12% of men and 19% of women surviving 5 years. Non-Hispanic Whites and those with higher socioeconomic status are diagnosed earlier. Risk for lung cancer increases with smoking, secondhand smoking, exposure to radon and air pollution. Those with family history of lung cancer are also at elevated risk. 

To view the full Lung Cancer Report, click on the buttons below! 

breast Cancer Minimonograph

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women regardless of race/ethnicity. Over 107,000 women were diagnosed with breast cancer between 2000-2017 in Los Angeles County, with about 6,900 women diagnosed in 2017. Older women are more likely to be diagnosed at localized stage due to mammogram screening for women starting at ages 40-50. Non-Hispanic Black women and Hispanic women, those with lower socioeconomic status, and those with HER2+ breast cancer or triple-negative breast cancer (i.e., negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2) are less likely to be diagnosed at localized stage. Younger women and Non-Hispanic Blacks are more likely to have triple-negative breast cancer. Breast cancer incidence is highest in Non-Hispanic White women; however, breast cancer mortality is highest in Non-Hispanic Black women. The incidence in Asian/Pacific Islanders increased between 2000-2017 whereas the incidence in other race/ethnic groups remained stable at least since 2003. The survival rate is higher compared to most other cancers. For localized disease, 5-year and 10-year survival rates are 99% and 96%, respectively. Breast cancer survival shows substantial race/ ethnic and socioeconomic disparity: the 5-year survival rate is highest for Non-Hispanic Whites (92%) and lowest for Non-Hispanic Blacks (80%) and increases with increasing socioeconomic status. We provide a brief summary of known risk factors for breast cancer.

To view the full Breast Cancer Report, click the buttons below!